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I saw this and had to share it.

The English language must be the repository for more language excerpts that any other. English is a melange.

English is a West Germanic language that arose in the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England and spread into what was to become south-east Scotland under the influence of the Anglian medieval kingdom of Northumbria. Following the extensive influence of Great Britain and the United Kingdom from the 18th century, via the British Empire, and of the United States since the mid-20th century,[6][7][8][9] it has been widely dispersed around the world, becoming the leading language of international discourse and the lingua franca in many regions.[10][11] It is widely learned as a second language and used as an official language of the European Union and many Commonwealth countries, as well as in many world organisations. It is the third most natively spoken language in the world, after Mandarin Chinese and Spanish.[12] It is the most widely spoken language across the world.[13]

Historically, English originated from the fusion of languages and dialects, now collectively termed Old English, which were brought to the eastern coast of Great Britain by Germanic (Anglo-Saxon) settlers by the 5th century – with the word English being derived from the name of the Angles, and ultimately from their ancestral region of Angeln (in what is now Schleswig-Holstein).[14] A significant number of English words are constructed based on roots from Latin, because Latin in some form was the lingua franca of the Christian Church and of European intellectual life.[15] The language was further influenced by the Old Norse language due to Viking invasions in the 8th and 9th centuries.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1spqX4sIDo

The Chaos by G. Nolst Trenite’ a.k.a. “Charivarius” 1870 – 1946

G. Nolst Trenite’ a.k.a. “Charivarius” offerred this a long time ago.

http://www.thepoke.co.uk/2011/12/23/english-pronunciation/

As a non-native English speaker I have been struggling with studying your language for 10 years..The following poem (which my phonetics professor made me learn by heart) is a great tool for studying pronuncition of most difficult English words to foreigners. Since many of you are tutoring English I thought I’d place this funny rhyme so that you could use it as one of the most pleasant techniques of teaching your language!

If you can pronounce correctly every word in this poem, you will be speaking English better than 90% of the native English speakers in the world.

After trying the verses, a Frenchman said he’d prefer six months of hard labour to reading six lines aloud.

Dearest creature in creation,
Study English pronunciation.

I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.

Just compare heart, beard, and heard,
Dies and diet, lord and word,
Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
(Mind the latter, how it’s written.)
Now I surely will not plague you
With such words as plaque and ague.

But be careful how you speak:
Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;
Cloven, oven, how and low,
Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe.

Hear me say, devoid of trickery,
Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore,
Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles,
Exiles, similes, and reviles;
Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
Solar, mica, war and far;
One, anemone, Balmoral,
Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel;
Gertrude, German, wind and mind,
Scene, Melpomene, mankind.

Billet does not rhyme with ballet,
Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
Blood and flood are not like food,
Nor is mould like should and would.

Viscous, viscount, load and broad,
Toward, to forward, to reward.

And your pronunciation’s OK
When you correctly say croquet,
Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
Friend and fiend, alive and live.
Ivy, privy, famous; clamour
And enamour rhyme with hammer.

River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
Doll and roll and some and home.
Stranger does not rhyme with anger,
Neither does devour with clangour.
Souls but foul, haunt but aunt,
Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant,
Shoes, goes, does.

Now first say finger,
And then singer, ginger, linger,
Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge,
Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age.

Query does not rhyme with very,

Nor does fury sound like bury.

Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth.
Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath.

Though the differences seem little,
We say actual but victual.

Refer does not rhyme with deafer.

Fe0ffer does, and zephyr, heifer.

Mint, pint, senate and sedate;
Dull, bull, and George ate late.
Scenic, Arabic, Pacific, Science, conscience, scientific.
Liberty, library, heave and heaven,
Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven.

We say hallowed, but allowed,
People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
Mark the differences, moreover,
Between mover, cover, clover;
Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
Chalice, but police and lice;
Camel, constable, unstable,
Principle, disciple, label.
Petal, panel, and canal,
Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal.
Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair,
Senator, spectator, mayor.
Tour, but our and succour, four.

Gas, alas, and Arkansas.

Sea, idea, Korea, area, Psalm, Maria, but malaria.

Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean.

Doctrine, turpentine, marine.
Compare alien with Italian,
Dandelion and battalion.

Sally with ally, yea, ye,
Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key.

Say aver, but ever, fever,

Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver.

Heron, granary, canary.
Crevice and device and aerie.
Face, but preface, not efface.

Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass.

Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging.

Ear, but earn and wear and tear
Do not rhyme with here but ere.

Seven is right, but so is even,
Hyphen, roughen, nephew
Stephen, Monkey, donkey,
Turk and jerk,
Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.

Pronunciation (think of Psyche!)
Is a paling stout and spikey?

Won’t it make you lose your wits,
Writing groats and saying grits?

It’s a dark abyss or tunnel:
Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale,
Islington and Isle of Wight, Housewife, verdict and indict.

Finally, which rhymes with enough,
Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough?

Hiccough has the sound of cup.
My advice is to give up!!!

English Pronunciation by G. Nolst Trenité

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Personal Evolution

Personal Evolution

The world around us changes so quickly now that we must be flexible … curious … eager to learn.

If we don’t …

we won’t prosper …

possibly … we won’t survive.

My thanks for the image go to the The Other 98% Facebook site and whom ever their source might be. Alvin Toffler deserves your attention when he speaks.

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Think About What You Can Learn From the Customers You Lose

Here is a situation that businesses repeat much too often.

 

I am amazed

After more than a year as a regular customer … paying a $150+ each month, investing an incredible amount of time participating in discussions with them regarding the use of their product …

We cut our spending with the company by 50%.

 

And Incredibly

The company never asked “why?”

 

Disappointed by a Continued Failure to Listen to Customers

Two months later, we stopped all purchases.Customer Feedback

 

And Again

The company never asked “why?”

 

Why?

I’ve always been taught that a business can gain valuable insights from the customers it loses.  From them, you learn what you could have done to keep them satisfied … how to retain and regain customers.

 

It made no sense to us, but confirmed our decision.

Lost Account ResearchMy Marketing education and experience says “customer research is critical.”

My Sales experience says “find out what went wrong.”

My Strategic experience says “learn how to fix it.”

 

And reinforced the idea that Common Sense is truly an uncommon commodity.

In the days that followed we learned that other customers had dropped away.

Each one of them reported that …

The company never asked “why?”

Is Your Feedback Important?

Is Your Feedback Important?

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People who have a product or service often do a poor job of explaining why you should choose their solution.

The standard demo or product description may offer user instructions in excruciating detail. 

Too often, they fail to inspire the user regarding how to apply the new solution to everyday life. 

I’m working with a couple software packages with extensive galleries of “How To” videos but they are “lite” on “Why Do” I want to use a feature.

Don’t give me a multitude of tools … without clearly explaining the things I can fix … and problems I can solve by using your tools.

Before you try to teach me your process … Show me why I would want to invest the time or money.

Give me a reason. Give me examples. Give me a mentor

Help your potential customers visualize how these tools fit into their lives.  More importantly, demonstrate the benefit … the value … of the technology.

Social Media technophiles should listen & heed.

I recently watched  Bill Vick’s video interview with Patty Rappa, described as a Business 2.0 Strategist, and author of a soon-to-be-released book, Millennial Boomer.

Rappa seems to be one Marketing professional that has been listening to Boomer clients  about their views regarding Social Media.  Her contribution to the “Give Me” list above might be …

Give Me Some Comfort With the Technology.

Patty Rappa says she has learned much from Boomers, as her career has progressed.  Rappa has found that when it comes to Social Media, Boomers often “get it” better than some younger people.  Or, at least, once Boomers understand what is possible with LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, blogging, and other tools, they can quickly see how to apply the tools to real world situations.

She described ways she helps bridge the gap between Boomers and other generations.  She has found that her Millennial Tech-Savvy employees and Boomer clients can be paired in mutually beneficial working relationships.   

Millennials are in-touch with the current technology.  Boomers have perspective based on more years of experience. 

By working together both can learn about how to effectively apply new technologies to traditional business communication issues. 

Rappa sees her book Millennial Boomer as an attempt to re-ignite Boomer creativity in the arena of communicating a company’s outreach message to the market by helping Boomers use Social Media tools.

How many times have you … or someone you know … asked a teenager to help them with a computer or Internet problem? 

We didn’t grow up surrounded by computers and a multitude of electronic gadgets; younger people are doing so.  You would expect them to be tuned in to technology.

Working with Millennials on applying social media tools, Boomers are likely to find the kind of technical savvy they need to “re-ignite” some creativity in the process of communicating with customer audiences.  Millennials may find that Boomers can show them more about business and strategy.

 I look forward to learning more about how Patty Rappa thinks. 

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